Our History

Imagine a respectful, diverse, positive workplace. Every HR professional’s dream. But how do you achieve this? Catharsis Productions’ program, Not Suitable For Work, teaches you how to create a great workplace culture, by recognizing and removing toxic behavior, such as microaggressions and unconscious bias. Date: December 5, 2019 Time: HRCI recertification hours (CEU's): 1

Earn credits towards your certification while learning how to recognize discrimination, retaliation, or a microaggression and how to respond in a productive manner to create positive change.

What you can Expect

Our educators, program staff, and office team have the experience you need.

1

Catharsis Productions performs Regular Quality Control Observations and standardized required self-evaluations.

2

Each member of our seasoned cadre of educators has delivered an average of 300 presentations.

3

Educators are trained on content including: Rape Trauma Syndrome; victimization; perpetrator profiles; the role of alcohol in perpetration; and relevant components of military culture.

4

All newly-hired educators receive over 200 hours of instruction and training before being paired with a seasoned veteran to deliver programs.

Our Programs

Innovative prevention education programming for civilian and military audiences.

  • New Solider
    Sex Signals - Military
  • Experienced Solider
    Got Your Back
  • Transfer Capacity
    FOAI - Military
  • Solider in Leadership
    Beat the Blame Game - Military
  • Solider in Command
    The Canary in the Coal Mine
  • New Solider

    Sex Signals - Military

    Program Overview

    Sex Signals is a two-person interactive training that aligns the mission of sexual assault prevention with military core values. The program’s strategic use of humor, audience interaction, branch-specific culture, and real-life military-based scenarios is research-supported, and builds equity with audiences in order to create learning opportunities surrounding the topic of sexual assault.

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    Learning Objectives Include:
    • The definition of rape is sex without consent.
    • Consent must be active (e.g., verbal) and ongoing for it to be present, and cannot be obtained from someone who is incapacitated (by alcohol, drugs, etc.) and one actively taking advantage of this incapacitation is committing sexual assault.
    • The sexual initiator is responsible for being certain that consent is present.
    • Both men and women can be victims of sexual assault, regardless of gender identity or sexual orientation.
    • Sexual assault is much more than a crime; it is a moral issue and thus preventing it through bystander intervention and supporting those who have been victimized, aligns with Army core values.
  • Experienced Solider

    Got Your Back

    Program Overview

    Got Your Back is an interactive conversation that integrates the research on sexual predation and bystander intervention into a discussion about sexual violence. The training addresses how sexualized language, and a tolerance for coercive cultural norms contribute to an environment that allows perpetrators to offend against both female and male victims, and avoid accountability. Participants are taught critical skills that enable them to identify multiple points along the continuum of harm for them to intervene and support potential victims.

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    Learning Objectives Include:
    • Explain the continuum of harm; make connections between sexual harassment, sexist language and the perpetuation of a culture that supports sexual harassment; hazing, and sexual assault
    • Examine the predator profile and identify enablers, bystanders, and interveners
    • Identify the impact of sexual violence on victims and the military’s mission, and explore the role alcohol plays in sexual situations, both consensual and coercive
    • Draw attention to male victims of sexual assault; the ways in which they are victimized; the challenges faced when identifying as a victim, and how their experience aligns with the research on sexual predation and hazing
    • Identify social cues a bystander could interpret as signs that an intervention is warranted, and inspire confidence in participants’ intervention strategies through discussion of realistic scenarios
  • Transfer Capacity

    FOAI - Military

    Program Overview

    The Armed Force of Awesome is designed to allow military educators and leadership to rethink their current training approach to both reduce incidents and systematically engage in a cultural change with regard to these issues. Specifically, participants are taught how to design more effective instruction for specific audiences, as well as learning how to better deliver challenging content. This is critical, as the subject matter expertise alone does not ensure that the trainer has the ability to translate it in an effective, accessible manner. Furthermore, a poor educator can do irreparable damage to the overall mission. Accordingly, this Institute provides a remarkable opportunity for each branch of the military to build a cadre of qualified trainers, who can design and deliver content-rich programs that transform their communities.

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    Learning Objectives Include:
    • Identify the factors that make audiences resistant to workshop content related to sexual and interpersonal violence
    • Design presentations for specific, challenging audiences, including tailoring the delivery of those programs for those audiences
    • Build intentional interactive components into every presentation, consistent with the best adult learning theory practices
    • Develop the ability to assess presentation effectiveness with the use of specific objective criteria
    • Identify individual presentation delivery strengths and weaknesses, and receive both peer and expert coaching on how to systematically improve performance
  • Solider in Leadership

    Beat the Blame Game - Military

    Program Overview

    In order for sexual predators to be stopped and held accountable, the culture must see their actions as deplorable and in direct opposition to their mission and core values. A critical strategy for eliminating a rape-supportive culture is challenging victim blaming—the belief that the victim is at least partly responsible for their rape. Individuals who blame rape victims for their victimization are less able to support survivors in their midst, intervene proactively when they see an individual in a sexually threatening situation, and will fail to challenge the larger culture that supports sexually coercive behavior. To meet this need, Beat the Blame Game actively engages participants in breaking down the most common reasons why people blame victims and support alleged perpetrators, and then dismantles those arguments by applying logic, ethics, and exposing the reality of sexual violence. Our highly-skilled educators are able to engage participants (in both small and large groups) in a dynamic conversation that enables them to challenge their own beliefs without being shamed, as well as provide the skills to constructively challenge those views when expressed by others. In addition, this enables the survivors of sexual violence, both male and female, to cease blaming themselves for their victimization, and get the critical support they need to recover. This program can be adapted for a range of audiences, including leadership; trainers; civilian populations; and, diverse audiences.

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    Learning Objectives Include:
    • Introduce participants to the concepts of “Just World Hypothesis” and “Hindsight Bias,” in order to understand why so many people justify victim blaming arguments and false beliefs about sexual violence
    • Enable participants to recognize the distinct markers of victim blaming arguments and the beliefs that undergird them, both in their own thinking and in others
    • Enable participants to understand the different ways in which male and female victims are blamed
    • Provide participants with counter-arguments they can use to challenge victim blaming statements
    • Enable participants to better support survivors who may be blaming themselves for their victimization, instead of getting the help they need
  • Solider in Command

    The Canary in the Coal Mine

    Program Overview

    The term “rape culture” is often used to describe the way aspects of a society can contribute to the normalization and endorsement of sexual violence. Typically, those elements include the objectification of women’s bodies and the trivialization of coercion and sexual violation. While these elements are most powerfully disseminated through the media, the average citizen is a very able transmitter of rape culture, too. That said, the term “rape culture” can be less than helpful. The term can often prompt defensiveness, especially if audiences feel they’re being judged and implicated by every song, movie, or T.V. show they’ve enjoyed throughout their lives. It is critical, however, that we find a way of describing the ways in which our culture endorses and provides cover for sexual coercion and violence in a way in which people can hear it. This is especially critical in military contexts. Sometimes military traditions, entertainment, and sponsored programs can either implicitly or explicitly contradict sexual violence prevention messages. In addition, UCMJ processes and internal sexual assault investigations may be conducted by those who have never thought critically about the ways in rape culture may have affected their perceptions of victims and perpetrators. To that end, this presentation utilizes the ongoing debate over whether or not rape jokes are appropriate to explore the foundations of rape culture in a meaningful and accessible way. The workshop will highlight what factors support sexual violence within popular and military cultures, drawing on research from the fields of moral development education, bystander intervention, and sexual violence prevention education. The presentation will include research data from both the civilian and military environments and will address what steps—from little to big—will be necessary to meaningfully address the impact of rape culture on our communities.

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    Learning Objectives Include:
    • Participants will learn the ways in which rape jokes and other media can foster a hostile environment
    • Participants will learn the connections between a hostile environment and the increased risk of sexual violence
    • Participants will identify what aspects of culture and media support sexual coercion and violence
    • Participants will develop their own critical lens to reflect on the popular culture they consume and enjoy
    • Participants will develop the skills to challenge rape jokes and other media in order to foster an environment that helps disable the potential predator’s support system

Real Results

After seeing a Catharsis Productions presentation

  • 85%

    of respondents say that if they hear someone at work making inappropriate sexual comments to someone else, they will say or do something about it –Survey Result, Got Your Back, 2014

  • 95%

    of respondents commented that they felt more confident in their understanding of “consent” following the presentation –Survey Result, Sex Signals. January 2015

  • 94%

    of respondents felt that the presentation provided them some intervention tools that they could employ while at BCT –Survey Result, Sex Signals, January 2015

  • 92%

    of participants agreed the scenarios were more applicable to AIT than most of the sexual assault training they had previously received –Survey Result, Platoon Sergeant School Pilot

Contact Us

info@catharsisproductions.com

General Questions
312-243-0022

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“Phenomenal training. It really opened my eyes to perceptions on sexual violence.”
Attendee, 2010 Air Mobility Command Conference